A Cut Above: Things You May Want To Know About Bias Cut

Have you once noticed that certain, relatively simple clothing pieces tend to adapt to your body without being skin tight? Maybe the fabric feels like a second skin,clinging naturally to your curves and enabling your body to move freely?
You probably aren’t aware of it but the garment was most likely created using a bias-cut technique. Never heard of this? Don’t worry, you aren’t alone. Read on and I’ll give you the lowdown on this style. (Also, as a bonus, I’ll share with you some awesome inspirations for your next shopping marathon.)

Let’s start with a bit of history and an introduction to the brilliant French designer, Madeleine Vionnet. During the early 20th century – an era of corsets and padding – the progressive Vionnet introduced comfortable bias-cut garments that a woman could put on easily. She found her inspiration in Greco-Roman art in Italy.

 

CN00004764
ca. 1931 — Model wearing pale crepe romain pajamas by Vionnet holding long flowing scarf,
in Grecian-style pose — Image by © Condé Nast Archive/CORBIS

 
Unlike a traditional cut on the straight grain, the bias-cut technique is performed in diagonal direction of the  cloth. The process takes a lot of fabric and a lot of skill. This is the reason that quite often the mass-produced imitation of  designer garment  doesn’t bring out the best of the body as easily as the designer original.

But I’m getting a bit ahead of myself. Back to the genius of Madeleine Vionnet.

Japanese designer Issey Miyake once said: “the impression (of Vionnet’s clothing) was similar to the wonder one feels at the sight of a woman emerging from bathing, draped only in a single piece of beautiful cloth.”

And he wasn’t her only admirer. She influenced Halston, John Galliano, Comme des Garçons and many other famous contemporary designers. 

If you have a curvy body and you are not a big fan of structural clothes, you may want to consider a bias-cut piece that gently accentuates your lines while floating freely around the body.

Found on www.style.com

Lanvin Pre-Fall 2015. Found on http://www.style.com

A great investment would be a minimalistic bias-cut dress that can be dressed up and dressed down. It’s especially a great choice if you have a busy lifestyle. 

Jason Wu Bias-Cut Silk-Panel Shirtdress


 

Layered asymmetric hem dress


La Petite Robe di Chiara Boni Melania Off-the-Shoulder Ruch-Skirt Cocktail Dress


 

Eileen Fisher Sleeveless Silk Asymmetric Dress


 

 For more ideas and inspirations follow my Pinterest board “Bias Cut” by clicking here.

Wishing you a wonderful summer! 

Ciao,

Lena.

ADD COMMENT

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s